How many songs did Elvis sing a week

After the sales successes of the double albums 32 Film-Hits - The best of his films on ZDF (1984) and 32 Film-Hits Vol. 2 - The best of his films on German television (1985), RCA summarized the publications at the end of 1985 in one Collectors box and names the product according to logic 64 movie hits - The Best From His Movies.

The records are housed in a film box that was inappropriately designed with a concert photo from the 1970s. Movie posters can also be seen, but the live image clearly dominates. The latter was already featured on the 1976 single For The Heart / Hurt and the LP From Elvis Presley Boulevard, Memphis, Tennessee. As a gimmick, the set includes a reproduction of the German cinema poster for King Creole / Mein Leben Ist Der Rhythmus. That was already the case with the double LP 32 film hits, the second part of the series was then included with Blue Hawaii / Blaues Hawaii.

 

Fun in Acapulco

The King's thirteenth feature film was released in November 1963 and ranked fifth on Variety's weekly hit parade. The accompanying soundtrack album and the single Bossa Nova Baby made it into the Top 10 on the Billboard charts and sold millions of copies.

The title song of the film by Ben Weisman and Sid Wayne describes an idealized holiday setting and spreads a relaxed holiday mood. Elvis recorded the song on January 23, 1963, and the first take became a master.

 

Mexico

This song is also bursting with joie de vivre and Mediterranean flair and is performed by Elvis with audible enthusiasm. In Germany, RCA Victor even released the song together with You Can't Say No In Acapulco on a single and was thus able to land a Top30 hit.

On January 22, 1963, Elvis recorded seven takes of the brisk Latin number before declaring the fifth attempt a master. Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett are once again responsible as composers.

 

Marguerita

Don Robertson had written great ballads for Elvis in the past and Marguerita is no exception. The singer celebrates his love for said lady with a lot of southern drama, whereby the King does his job again fully.

Without a doubt, this song is one of the highlights of this soundtrack. It was recorded on January 22nd, 1963, and Take 8 became the master.

 

Bossa Nova baby

The absolute hit of the soundtrack album is of course Bossa Nova Baby from the pen of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. The original is from Tippie & The Clovers from 1962. Musically, Bossa Nova belongs more to Brazil than Mexico, but you shouldn't dwell on such details in Elvis films.

The King recorded the song on January 22nd, 1963, Take 11 became the master. RCA Victor released the song on a single in October 1963, giving Elvis another Top10 hit. This is why Bossa Nova Baby was later found on the 4-LP box Worldwide 50 Gold Award Hits - Volume 1 (1970).

 

Blue Hawaii

We jump back to 1961 and land on one of the King's most successful screen adventures. In the USA and Canada alone, the film grossed five million US dollars, and the soundtrack (album and single) was one of the absolute bestsellers in the Presley catalog, with over 14 million copies sold. Elvis was also recognized artistically. The film was nominated for a Laurel Award, the album for a Grammy.

The title song of the film was written by Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger, Bing Crosby sang it as early as 1937 and Patti Page and Frank Sinatra had also recorded Blue Hawaii for Elvis. The version of the King was created on March 22, 1961, Take 7 became the master. Even if Blue Hawaii is not one of my favorites, the song still has a pleasant holiday atmosphere and fits the theme of the film perfectly.

In January 1973 Elvis recorded the song again for the TV show Aloha From Hawaii Via Satellite, but it sounded more tired than romantic-dreamy.

 

Can't Help Falling In Love

Two months after the album was released, RCA released Victor Can't Help Falling In Love on a single with Rock-A-Hula Baby. Because the song was already available on the LP, Colonel Parker feared a flop and initially resisted the plans of the record company. Only when he was guaranteed royalties for a million singles regardless of the actual sales did he let himself be changed. The Presley manager's worries were unfounded, however, because the 45s became a global hit and was sold more than four million times over the counter.

The song was later also found on the 4-LP box Worldwide 50 Gold Award Hits - Volume 1 (1970) and the album A Legendary Performer - Volume 1 (1974). The LPs Elvis (1968), From Memphis To Vegas / From Vegas To Memphis (1969), Elvis As Recorded At Madison Square Garden (1972), Aloha From Hawaii Via Satellite (1973), Elvis Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis (1974) and Elvis In Concert (1977) contain live recordings. However, the King never came close to the beauty and perfection of his studio recording.

The film is geographically less precise, because the main actor sings the song to the melody of a music box that supposedly came from Austria. In reality, however, the song is based on the French Plaisir d'amour, which was written in 1785 by Jean-Pierre Claris de Florian and Johann Paul Egidius Martini Schwarzendorf.

It was adapted for Elvis by Hugo Peretti, Luigi Creatore and George David Weiss. The recording was made on March 23, 1961 within 29 takes.

 

Rock-a-hula baby

This is followed by the B-side of the aforementioned single. The song was written by Fred Wise, Ben Weisman and Dolores Fuller, and it was recorded on March 23, 1961 within five takes.

In an interview, Mrs. Fuller once said that she was inspired to write her composition by The Twist. In fact, RCA Victor also tried to profit from the hype about fashion dance at the time and marketed the 45s as a "Twist Special". Overall, I think the number is quite successful, among the film hits it is undoubtedly one of the highlights.

In 1970 Rock-A-Hula Baby was also found on the 4-LP box Worldwide 50 Gold Award Hits - Volume 1.

 

Ku-U-I-Po

Ku-U-I-Po is another ballad penned by Hugo Peretti, Luigi Creatore and George David Weiss. Elvis also took up this title again in January 1973 for the Aloha From Hawaii Via Satellite show, but here, too, it seemed more tired than romantic.

The studio recording from March 21, 1961 sounds absolutely great and for me is one of the best movie tunes of the King, which incidentally required nine takes to record Ku-U-I-Po (the Hawaiian word Ku-u corresponds to the American sweetheart).

 

King Creole

The rocker was penned by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller and represents the title song of the screen adventure. Because it is set in New Orleans, the song was accompanied by brass, which sets it apart from the other recordings of this kind.

On January 15, 1958, Elvis played 18 takes of King Creole, but was dissatisfied with the end result. And so on January 23rd, thirteen more takes followed, the last of which was finally declared a master.

When the LP was released, fans already knew the song from the EP King Creole - Volume 1 (1958), and later it was also featured on the box The Other Sides - Worldwide Gold Award Hits Volume 2 (1971).

The film was released in July 1958 and reached fifth place on the weekly hit parade of Variety magazine.

RCA Victor cannibalized the film with a single, two EPs, and an album. In total, the records sold more than nine million copies and brought the King several gold and platinum awards.

 

Hard headed woman

The singer wants to use various examples from the Bible to prove that stubborn women are the root of all evil. Elvis sings powerfully, almost aggressively, making the song a real experience. I also like the brass accompaniment, which sets Hard Headed Woman apart from other songs of this kind.

The rock and roll was written by Claude DeMetrius and the recording was made on January 15, 1958 at Radio Recorders in Hollywood, California. The tenth pass became the master take.

RCA Victor also released the song on the single Hard Headed Woman / Don't Ask Me Why (1958), the EP A Touch Of Gold - Volume 1 (1959) and the 4-LP box Worldwide 50 Gold Award Hits - Volume 1 (1970).

 

Trouble

Trouble is also one of the best Presley songs for me. Elvis puts the highest level of menace into his voice and delivers a grandiose interpretation of this composition by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller.

In 1968 the King also opened his TV show SINGER presents Elvis with this number and also sang the song during the Elvis Summer Festival 1973 in Las Vegas. However, the studio recording of January 15, 1958 (Take 5 became the master) remained unmatched.

Before the soundtrack album was released, Trouble had already been released on the EP King Creole - Volume 2 (1958), later RCA Victor released it again on the 4-LP box The Other Sides - Worldwide Gold Award Hits Volume 2 (1971) out. Another version can be found on the album Elvis (1968).

 

Dixiland rock

As the title suggests, it's a rock'n'roll song with Dixiland influences. It was written by Aaron Schroeder and Rachel Frank, but the names Claude DeMetrius and Fred Wise keep appearing.

Elvis played Dixiland Rock on January 16, 1958, Take 14 became a master.

Dixiland Rock can also be heard on the EP King Creole - Volume 2 (1958) and the box The Other Sides - Worldwide Gold Award Hits Volume 2 as well as the soundtrack LP (1958).

 

Frankie and Johnny

Musically, the album remains true to the Louisiana style, but we're jumping eight years forward. The King's twentieth feature film was called Frankie And Johnny, was released in November 1966 and had sales of 4.5 million records in record stores. The two songs heard here were also released on a single by RCA Victor, with the Elvis was still able to land a Top30 hit.

The strip's theme song dates back to the 19th century and is also known as Frankie And Albert. There are many different versions, but what they have in common is that Frankie shoots her lover Johnny (or optionally Albert) out of jealousy. In some versions she ends up in jail for this, in others she is executed. The version heard here was edited by Alex Gottlieb, Fred Karger and Ben Weisman and recorded by Elvis on May 14, 1965 within six takes.

Frankie And Johnny is one of my favorites among the Movie Tunes, as the title differs significantly from the other film hits of the time and Elvis also performed it with vigor. In 1972 the number was also found on the CAMDEN album Elvis Sings Hits From His Movies - Volume 1.

 

Please don't stop loving me

It is not surprising that RCA Victor made the ballad on the B-side of this single. Without question, the composition by Joy Byers is one of the best titles from the film and thus the number was also a good advertisement for the LP.

Elvis apparently recognized the quality of Please Don't Stop Loving Me and invested nineteen takes in the recording on May 13, 1965.

 

Easy come, easy go

The theme song for the movie Seaman, Ahoy! was written by Ben Weisman and Sid Wayne and was recorded by Elvis on September 28, 1966 within nine takes. The singer has a different girl in every port, everything is uncomplicated, just Easy Come, Easy Go.

I would describe the song as a typical film hit these days - not bad, but nothing special either. In 1971 the song was also found on the CAMDEN LP C'mon Everybody.

 

Sing You Children

Also worth listening to is Sing You Children, written by Gerald Nelson and Fred Burch. The melody is reminiscent of classic gospel songs, the text is about Jonas and Moses. That is why the title was later found on the CAMDEN LP You'll Never Walk Alone, which in 1971 summarized some of the King's religious recordings.

By the way, the song was originally supposed to be called Sing You Sinners, Sing, but in the end it was thought to be inappropriate to have Elvis preach to sinners in a lightweight entertainment film. The King invested a fair amount of time in this song and made twenty-two takes of it on September 28, 1966.

 

Tonight Is So Right For Love

After serving in the army, Elvis contacted G.I. Blues back on the big screen. In the box office hit parade, the strip reached second place, and the soundtrack went over the counter more than nine million times. The script was nominated for a Laurel Award, the LP for a Grammy. Overall, G.I. Blues is the singer's most successful project to date.

Sid Wayne and Abner Silver took the barcarole from Hoffmann's stories by Jeacques Offenbach and turned it into Tonight Is So Right For Love. On April 27, 1960, Elvis first recorded seven takes of this song before giving up in exasperation and devoting himself to What's She Really Like and Frankfort Special. It wasn't until a few hours later that he came back to the Wayne / Silver composition and recorded another four takes. He finally declared the last of them a master.

However, there were problems with copyright outside the USA, because Offenbach's Barcarole did not fall under the public domain for a long time. So, with the help of Joseph Lilley, the two authors also edited the stories from the Vienna Woods by Johann Strauss (son). The result was called Tonight Is All Right For Love and was recorded on May 6, 1960. This time Elvis recorded 17 takes and two work parts, the master was combined from takes 10 and 2 (work part). As the two titles suggest, the songs are very similar.

In both cases, the singer tries to seduce his loved one by raving about the oh-so-romantic night.

Just as RCA Victor released Tonight Is So Right For Love and Tonight Is All Right For Love on the LP, depending on local copyright regulations, Paramount also had both songs filmed in front of an identical backdrop and included the legally compliant version in the respective cut versions. In the USA Tonight Is All Right For Love was only released in 1974 on the LP A Legendary Performer - Volume 1.

 

Frankfort Special

Here the singer is already looking forward to the big German city with a similar spelling, whereby the female residents are particularly close to his heart.

The lively song was written by Sid Wayne and Sherman Edwards and was recorded by Elvis on April 27, 1960. Because he was not satisfied with the result, he recorded the song again on May 6, which required ten takes. With a few interjections from the Jordanaires, German flair should be created again here. Frankfort Special is not one of my favorites, but the song is OK for a hit movie.

 

Wooden Heart

As early as 1827, the German folk song Muss I Denn, Muss I Denn Zum Städtele Hinaus was adapted by Friedrich Silcher, 133 years later Fred Wise, Ben Weisman, Kay Twomey and Bert Kaempfert took up the song again and turned it into Wooden Heart. Elvis recorded the title on April 28, 1960 and, despite the verse in German, only needed four takes.

RCA Victor also released the song on a single in Europe, Asia and South Africa and sold more than two million copies in Germany alone. In the US, unfortunately, the butter was taken off the bread and the success was left to Joe Dowell, who reached first place on the Hot 100 with his version. Curiously, Elvis' recording was later found on the B-sides of the singles Blue Christmas (1964) and Puppet On A String (1965). In 1970 Wooden Heart could also be heard on the 4-LP box Worldwide 50 Gold Award Hits - Volume 1.

 

G.I. blues

The singer laments his fate as a US soldier stationed in Germany in a humorous way. According to the theme of the film, the song has a military rhythm and also contains some German words.

The song was written by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett, and the recording took place on April 27, 1960. The master is a combination of take 7 and take 10 (work part).

 

Blue Suede Shoes

Elvis had already recorded the rock'n'roll classic four years earlier, and did it again for the film on April 28, 1960. In the Golden Fifties he really had a blast on this number, but here it sounds comparatively tame and Blue Suede Shoes is more like country again.

 

Doin 'The Best I Can

The ballad was penned by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman, and it was recorded on April 27, 1960 within 13 takes.

Without a doubt, it is not just the absolute highlight of the G.I. Blues soundtracks, but also one of the King's finest movie hits. Unfortunately, the song is all too often overlooked today.

 

A dogs life

It continues with a song from the movie Paradise, Hawaiian Style. The 1966 film was not nearly as successful as G.I. Blues. In the box office hit parade it only landed at number 40 and the album also had to settle for 15th place in the Billboard charts.

The song itself is a typical film hit. Rick (Elvis) flies the dogs of a rich lady around in a helicopter and, while singing, thinks about how nice a dog's life would be for him too.

The music was recorded on July 27, 1965 within five takes, Elvis' vocals followed on August 1 within 9 takes. The authors are called Sid Wayne and Ben Weisman.

 

Charro!

The 1969 western performed even worse. It only made it to 68th place in the cinema charts, and RCA only released the title track on the B-side of the single Memories.

However, I like the song itself very much. The western song was recorded on October 15, 1968 at the Samuel Goldwyn Studio in Hollywood, California. For the rhythm track, the musicians needed five attempts, Elvis' vocal part was composed of takes 5 and 9. The orchestral overdubs followed between November 25th and 27th. Charro! First featured on the CAMDEN album Almost In Love (1970).

The song was written by Billy Strange and Mac Davis, and Hugo Montenegro was responsible for arranging the orchestra.

 

Roustabout

Five years before Charro! the world looked even more rosy for Elvis. The film Roustabout was ranked among the top 30 in Variety's annual evaluation and was nominated for a Laurel Award. The accompanying album also sold splendidly and became a number 1 hit.

The title track is a composition by Bill Giant, Bernie Baum and Florence Kaye. The song was commissioned at short notice because the film producer Hal B. Wallis had retrospectively expressed concerns about the lyrics of I'm A Roustabout, the original theme song of the film.

For a long time, the number of Otis Blackwell and Winfiled Scott was thought to be lost and many people even suggested that Elvis did not record the song at all. In fact, on March 3, 1964, he had recorded it within six takes. The final proof of the existence of I'm A Roustabout was provided by Winfield Scott, who offered his acetate record to Sony / BMG for use almost 30 years after it was recorded. So the song finally found its way into the public and was released in 2003 on the CD 2nd To None.

Because the replacement song Roustabout was written later, additional sessions had to be scheduled. The rhythm track was created on May 29, 1964.

The musicians were more or less identical, only Bob Moore (bass), DJ Fontana and Hal Blaine (drums) and Floyd Kramer (piano) were replaced by Ray Siegel, Bernie Mattinson and Dudley Brooks. Since The Jordanaires were also not available, The Mello Men (Thurl Ravenscroft, Bill Lee, Bill Cole and Max Smith) were booked.

Elvis sang along with the playback on May 14, 1964. The master was put together from takes 11 (rhythm track) and 17 (vocal track).

The singer describes himself here as a drifter who moves from town to town and whom nothing and nobody can stop. However, he also hints at the hope that at some point he will have found his place and give up this restless life. The song has a pleasant splash and is nice to listen to.

 

Little Egypt

The song was penned by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller and was first recorded by the Coasters in 1961. On March 2, 1964, Elvis recorded 15 takes of the song and declared the last run to be a master. Nevertheless, six more takes were made the following day, numbered 16 to 21.

While the record version stuck to the original master, an additional overdubbing of takes 15 and 21 was used for the film.

In the humorous song, the interpreter visits the erotic dance event of the said Little Egypt, finally conquers her heart - and makes her a 7-fold (!) Mother. Compared to the original, the recording of the King looks more pleasing and also meets my personal taste.

By the way, four years later Elvis remembered this song again and used Little Egypt in the TV show SINGER presents Elvis.

 

Poison Ivy League

Once again we get to hear a typical film hit, rewritten by Bill Giant, Bernie Baum and Florence Kaye.

Elvis makes fun of rich students here who buy their degrees and later make it big in daddy's company. In the corresponding scene, of course, the audience consists partly of this same clientele, which leads to a fight in the following. The brisk melody and the funny lyrics make Poison Ivy League a more than successful movie tune.

The song was recorded on March 2, 1964, Elvis took seven takes.

 

Girls! Girls! Girls!

The movie Girls! Girls! Girls! came to cinemas at the end of 1962 and was even nominated for a Golden Globe in the musical or comedy category. The accompanying single and album were also extremely successful and sold around 9.5 million times together.

It starts with the title song of the film. It was written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, and it was recorded on March 27, 1962 within three takes.

The singer is surrounded by so many girls that he can hardly contain himself and doesn't even come to eat. In principle, the text is quite funny, even if lines like "... and when I pick up a sandwich to munch, a chrunchy chrunchety a chrunchety chrunch" do not look particularly award-worthy. The original was played by The Coasters in 1961, by the way in the Hot 100, however, not beyond 96th place.

In my opinion, Elvis' version sounds clearly more pleasing than the original version and is certainly one of the movie tunes that are worth listening to.

 

Where Do You Come From

The ballad is by Ruth Batchelor and Bob Roberts and was recorded by Elvis on March 27, 1962. The King needed fourteen takes before he had the romantic song on tape to his satisfaction.

The beloved appears to the interpreter as so overwhelming and magnificent that he can only explain such a being as a supernatural existence. Despite the cheesy lyrics, I like this calm ballad, carried by piano and vocals, very much.

RCA Victor probably thought similar and published the song in advance on the single Return To Sender. Incidentally, this song does not even appear in the film.

 

Return To Sender

The lively pop song has already sold millions of times as a single and is undoubtedly one of the King's best movie tunes.

The singer apologizes twice in writing to his girlfriend after an argument, but receives the letter back unopened each time. Then he wants to take matters into his own hands and personally hand over the document to the lady - if he should get it back now, he knows where he is.

The song was written by Otis Blackwell and Winfield Scott, and it was recorded on March 27, 1962 in just two takes.

 

Follow that dream

The album ends with two songs from the soundtrack of the musical comedy Follow That Dream, which was released in theaters in spring 1962. The strip contained very few songs and therefore could not compete with the successes of the typical Presley musicals.

The title song was penned by Fred Wise and Ben Weisman and Elvis recorded it within six takes. The message that you should definitely follow your dream is wrapped in a lively pop melody and sung enthusiastically by Elvis. The song just spreads a good mood and therefore belongs to the best movie tunes of the King for me.

In 1971 CAMDEN released Follow That Dream on the LP C'mon Everybody.

 

fishing rod

The ballad was written by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett, Elvis took seven takes to record. I also like this wonderfully sung declaration of love very much and would certainly not have had a chance without the accompanying feature film.

Angel was also found on the album C'mon Everybody in 1971.

 

Jailhouse Rock

In October 1957, the third film by the rock'n'roll king premiered and later landed on the hit list of the most successful films of the year at number 14. The EP developed into an absolute high-flyer and became the best-selling release of this sound carrier format.

The legendary rock song was composed on April 30, 1957 at Radio Recorders in Hollywood, California. Initially, Elvis recorded eight takes, but only attempts 4 and 5 were completely successful. Then two so-called pick-up takes were produced, which started in the middle of the song and with which one could supplement the versions that were not completely played through before. The version that was finally released consists of take 6 (actually a long false start) and pick-up take 2.

RCA Victor also released Jailhouse Rock on a single and the albums Elvis' Golden Records (1958), Worldwide 50 Gold Award Hits - Volume 1 (1970), Pure Gold (1975) and A Legendary Performer - Volume 2 (1976). Live recordings can be found on the LPs Elvis (1968) and Elvis In Concert (1977). As part of the Rock 'n Roll Medley, the title is also included on Elvis Recorded Live On Stage In Memphis (1974).

For me, Jailhouse Rock is one of the King's absolute signature songs. No one, including himself, could ever match the class of his studio recording.

Incidentally, the title was written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, which is reflected, among other things, in the wonderfully subversive text.

 

Young and Beautiful

The ballad was penned by Abner Silver and Aaron Schroeder and was recorded by Elvis on April 30, 1957. Apparently the song was not easy for the King, because he needed 22 tries before he had the number in the can to his satisfaction.

RCA Victor later released Young And Beautiful on the album A Date With Elvis (1959) and the 4-LP box The Other Sides - Worldwide Gold Award Hits Volume 2 (1971).

In principle, I like the ballad very much, but I think Elvis would have sung it better a few years later.

 

(You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care

Because Bill Black couldn't do the bass intro, he stormed out of the studio in a rage and left the perplexed musicians in the recording room. To everyone's surprise, Elvis grabbed the bass himself and played the part as one had imagined. His singing served only as a rough model, the vocal tracks recorded on May 3, 1957, turned out to be inadequate. Therefore Elvis sang five days later on the MGM soundstage over the pre-produced playback. The master was finally put together from takes 16 (music) and 6 (vocals).

In 1959 (You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care was also featured on the album A Date With Elvis, and in 1971 it was released on the 4-LP box The Other Sides - Worldwide Gold Award Hits Volume 2.

By the way, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller were once again responsible for the composition of this fantastic song.

 

They Remind Me Too Much Of You

Six years after Jailhouse Rock, It Happened At The World's Fair hit theaters. The wild rocker had meanwhile turned into a nice guy with a tie and collar and the music sounded much more harmless. Elvis was still commercially successful, but a 55th place in the annual evaluation of the movies and 3rd place in the Billboard charts meant relegation .

The ballad, which was recorded on September 22, 1962 (Take 9 became the master), the fans already knew from the B-side of the single One Broken Heart For Sale.

For the songwriter, Don Robertson, it was an absolute godsend to be booked as a pianist during this session. Because someone suddenly noticed that the melody of They Remind Me Too Much Of You reminded a little too much of Chapel In The Moonlight and that there could be problems with the copyright.Normally you would have used another title in this situation, but because Don was in the studio, he was able to quickly change the crucial passages so that the song ultimately stayed in the film. Curiously, They Remind Me Too Much Of You still reminds of another song despite all the changes - namely Anything That's Part Of You, also composed by Robertson.

The ballad was later re-released on the 4-LP set The Other Sides - Worldwide Gold Award Hits Volume 2 (1971) and the CAMDEN album Elvis Sings Hits From His Movies - Volume 1 (1972).

 

Beyond The Bend

It continues with a lively pop song penned by Ben Weisman, Fred Wise and Dolores Fuller. The singer hopes that life will be better in another place and that he will find happiness there.

Originally the opening line was "Wheels, sing a happy song", because Elvis was supposed to be in a car in the relevant film scene. When the script was changed and the writers put their star on a plane instead, Weisman, Wise and Fuller quickly changed the text to "Breeze, sing a happy song". Overall, I would rate Beyond The Bend as high average. The song is nice to listen to, but doesn't leave a lasting impression.

Incidentally, it was recorded on September 22nd, 1962, and Take 4 became the master.

 

Relax

Because Elvis' film friend is a little shy, he wants to relax her with a song and sings Relax. The authors Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett were clearly based on Fever by Eddie Cooley and John Davenport (a pseudonym of Otis Blackwell) and thus delivered a number that was not very original, but still worth listening to.

The recording was made on August 30, 1962, and Elvis needed a total of 13 attempts before he had the song on the tape to his satisfaction.

 

One Broken Heart For Sale

The lively pop song was written by Otis Blackwell and Winfield Scott and also recorded by Blackwell himself. Elvis' version was created on September 22, 1962 at Radio Recorders in Hollywood, California, Take 5 became a master.

With a running time of only 1:34 minutes, the song is extremely short for a single, so it is a little surprising why RCA Victor did not use the film version, which has one more verse and thus at least the sound barrier of two Minutes.

Although the singer pours out his heart here and also offers the same for sale on this occasion, One Broken Heart For Sale with its lively melody immediately spreads a good mood and goes straight to the ear. The fact that the song sounds like a relative of Return To Sender, also by Blackwell / Scott, doesn't really bother me.

As already mentioned, the song first appeared on a single, in 1970 RCA released Victor One Broken Heart For Sale on the 4-LP box Worldwide 50 Gold Award Hits - Volume 1 again.

 

I'm Falling In Love Tonight

We hear another ballad by Don Robertson. Elvis recorded it on September 22nd, 1962, and it took eight takes. The song is carried by an organ played by Robertson himself.

Overall, I like this song a lot, even if it doesn't reach the quality of They Remind Me Too Much Of You.

 

No more

Blue Hawaii was already featured on the first part of the 32 film hits, but since it is one of the most successful and well-known films in the King's career, we get to hear more songs from it here.

Elvis recorded the version of La Paloma, edited by Don Robertson and Hal Blair, on March 21, 1961 within 13 takes. He then produced three more insert takes with the end of the song. The master was finally combined from take 13 and insert-take 3. Because Joseph Lilley did not number the improvements separately, the official take combination of the master is 13/16.

In the film, Chad (Elvis) says he brought the song back from Italy. In fact, the tango composed by Sebastian Yradier in the 1850s is a tribute to Cuban music.

In late 1972, CAMDEN released No More on the LP Burning Love And Hits From His Movies, and the following year Elvis recorded a new version of the ballad for the Aloha From Hawaii Via Satellite show.

 

Island of Love

The singer describes the beauty of the island of Kauai and once more spreads the holiday mood with a dash of romance. Elvis recorded the song in 13 takes on March 22, 1961, the composers being Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett.

 

Moonlight swim

It continues with this composition by Sylvia Dee and Ben Weisman. The Moonlight Swim had already been published in 1957 by Nick Noble (37th place) and Tony Perkins (24th place), Elvis' played its version on March 22, 1961 within four rounds.

He chose the third one as the master take, and on March 28, background vocals were also recorded. Here, too, it was decided to try the third time.

 

Hawaiian Sunset

The ballad penned by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett spreads a pleasantly romantic holiday mood and is wonderfully sung by Elvis. Hawaiian Sunset was recorded on March 21, 1961, the master is a combination of takes 4 and 7.

 

Beach boy blues

After a fight, Chad (Elvis) ends up in jail and sings the Beach Boy Blues. Of course, the song can't be compared to titles like Reconsider Baby (1960) or Stranger In My Own Hometown (1969), but it's not that bad for a hit movie and even comes with a bit of humor.

Elvis needed two takes for his recording on March 23, 1961, and the song was composed once again by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett.

 

Hawaiian Wedding Song

The trip to the South Seas ends with the Hawaiian Wedding Song, which was written as Ke Kali Nei Au by Charles King for the opera Prince Of Hawaii in 1926. Bing Crosby sang an English version called Here Ends The Rainbow two and a half decades later, and Andy Williams finally followed in 1959 with the text by Al Hoffman and Dick Manning, which can also be heard here.

Elvis' recording was made on March 22nd, 1961, after only two takes he had the number absolutely perfect.

In 1973 the King recorded the Hawaiian Wedding Song again for his TV special Aloha From Hawaii Via Satellite, and a live recording of the double album Elvis In Concert followed four years later.

 

The Love Machine

We jump in time to 1967 and hear two songs from the film Easy Come, Easy Go / Seemann Ahoi. This was also represented on the first part of the 32 film hits

In the flick, Ted (Elvis) visits his friend Judd's (Pat Harrington Jr.) club. There is also a wheel of fortune where you can win dates with beautiful girls. Of course, this wonderful invention must also be sung about what happens to The Love Machine. I like the song a lot, on the previous soundtrack LPs I had to hear less catchy tracks.

The authors are Gerald Nelson, Fred Burch and Chuck Taylor. Elvis recorded the song on September 29, 1966, and it took 12 tries.

Four years after its release on this EP, The Love Machine was also featured on the CAMDEN album I Got Lucky.

 

I'll take love

It continues with I'll Take Love, a nice pop song by Dolores Fuller and Mark Barkan. Because no satisfactory take could be recorded on September 28, 1966, the master from runs 4, 8 and 3 was cut together.

In 1971 I'll Take Love could be heard again on the album C'mon Everybody.

 

Rubberneckin '

Rubberneckin 'was created in the American Sound Studio, on January 20, 1969 Elvis recorded the song in just two takes. The background vocals were recorded between January 22nd and 24th, followed by the brass section on March 19th.

Although the title was not originally intended for it, Universal used it in the feature film Change Of Habit, RCA Victor released the number on the B-side of the single Don't Cry Daddy. In 2003 Sony / BMG released a ReMix created by Paul Oakenfold, which became a top 10 hit in Australia and some European countries.

By the way, Change Of Habit / Ein Himmlischer Schwindel was the last feature film by the King.

 

Change of Habit

Half a year after the cinema premiere of Change Of Habit (1969), RCA released the title track on the budget LP Let's Be Friends, which is distributed via the in-house CAMDEN label.

The singer advises certain people here to rethink their behavior. However, the film plays with the double meaning of the word "habit" and thus means both the habits and the religious costume of the nuns.

Elvis recorded Change Of Habit on March 5, 1969 at the Decca Universal Studio in Hollywood, California, in six takes. Unfortunately, the song is all too often overlooked today, but for me it is one of the King's best movie tunes.

 

Let us pray

This track was found on the 1971 budget LP You'll Never Walk Alone.

The composers are called Buddy Kaye and Ben Weisman, the recording took place on March 6, 1969 at Decca-Universal. Twenty days later the background vocals were added. Because Elvis was dissatisfied with his part, a rhythm track was created afterwards, to which the King sang again on September 26th at RCA Studio A in Nashville.

For me, Let Us Pray is also one of the highlights among the Movie Tunes.

 

El Torro

Now let's jump to the film Fun In Acapulco / Acapulco and thus back to 1963. This soundtrack was also dealt with in the first part of the 32 film hits, so now we get a lookup.

And it turns out to be extremely dramatic. A matador cannot get over the defeat that the bull El Torro once inflicted on him. And so the proud Spaniard went to the arena one more time at night to face El Torro and take revenge. But this time too the bull wins and the matador loses his life.

Elvis performs the song, penned by Bill Giant, Bernie Baum and Florence Kaye, very well and with the necessary drama. The recording was made on January 23, 1963, the master was cut from takes 2 and 1.

 

Vino, Dinero Y Amor

Vino, Dinero Y Amor, in which the singer sings about the good things in life, is a bit brisk. The song was written by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett, Elvis played it on January 22nd, 1963 within five takes. The song spreads southern joie de vivre and fits perfectly with the theme of the film.

 

Hard knocks

At the end of 1964 Elvis had another success with Roustabout / König Der Heissen Rhythmen. The strip landed in the top 30 of the year's hit list and the scriptwriters were nominated for a Laurel Award. The music was also well received; Elvis landed a number 1 hit on the Billboard charts with the soundtrack.

With this song the singer laments his hard life. A few years earlier, the song would have turned into a rock'n'roll number, in 1964 it was only enough for a quick pop song. On the whole, however, the song is nice to listen to and is performed well by Elvis.

It was written by Joy Byers, and the recording was made on March 2, 1964 in 11 takes.

 

One Track Heart

In the film, the artist is now announced as King Of The Hot Rhythms (German film title), so you could expect a rock'n'roll number. Instead there is only one brisk, but also quite edgeless pop song to be heard. Again Bernie Baum, Bill Giant and Florence Kaye were responsible for the title and once again the trio delivered a pleasing but not exactly memorable song.

It was recorded on March 3, 1964 within five takes.

 

Wheels On My Heals

The soundtrack ends with a lively pop song penned by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett. The recording was made on March 3, 1964 within seven takes.

When Elvis wanted to be accompanied by the Jordanaires, producer Joseph Lilley argued that the song was sung in the film while riding a motorcycle - so where should the other singers' voices come from? Elvis' counter-argument was as simple as it was plausible: From the same place where the music comes from!

 

Crawfish

With King Creole / My Life Is The Rhythm, Elvis said goodbye to show business in 1958 to do his military service. RCA Victor is releasing a single, two EPs and an album in this context. The success: nine million records sold!

Fred Wise and Ben Weisman wrote Crawfish for Elvis, who grossed the title in 7 takes on January 15th. The female voice belongs to the singer Kitty White. For the master, the recording was shortened by about a minute, and Ms. White's vocals were mixed a little into the background and given a reverb effect.

First it was released on the EP King Creole - Volume 2 (1958), later it was also found on the LP set The Other Sides - Worldwide Gold Award Hits Volume 2 (1971).

 

New Orleans

Elvis brings this bluesy number across absolutely fantastic. The picture was taken on January 15, 1958 and was taken within five times. The song was written by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett, who were supposed to deliver inconspicuous pop songs for the King's numerous films in the 1960s.

New Orleans was found on the EP King Creole - Volume 1 (1958) and the 4-LP set The Other Sides - Worldwide Gold Award Hits Volume 2 (1971).

 

Shoppin 'around

It continues with songs from the film GI Blues, the King's comeback on screen in 1960. It starts with one of the best songs on the soundtrack. It's no wonder, because this is not a song specially composed for the film, but the cover version of a 1958 recording by Joel Gray.

Elvis recorded Shoppin 'Around on April 27, 1960 within 11 takes, but was also dissatisfied with the end result and repeated the recording on May 6. This time there were seven runs, the last of which was declared a master.

In the lively pop song, the singer states that he has now found his great love and will therefore no longer look for other girls. The song was written by Sid Tepper, Roy C. Bennett and Aaron Schroeder.

 

What's She Really Like

With this song Elvis informs the listener about the characteristics of his girlfriend and expresses himself, how can it be otherwise, completely positive. The medium-tempo pop song has a pleasant melody and is performed well.

The latter speaks for the professionalism of the King, because after five takes he first threw in the towel on May 27, 1960 and gave up. The following day he tried the song 14 more times and also recorded three insert takes. The master is a compilation of takes 14 and 3 (work part). Because back then in the studio you just kept counting (i.e.the second session was started with take 6 and the insert takes numbered with the digits 20 to 22) is the official composition of the master take 19 and 22. Here, too, the authors are Sid Wayne and Abner Silver.

 

I'm Not The Marrying Kind

Like the double album 32 Film-Hits, the follow-up ends with two songs from the soundtrack of the film Follow That Dream / A Summer In Florida.

Without a doubt, this is the weakest song on the soundtrack, but in connection with the film, the funny song is okay for me. After eight takes, Elvis had Mack David's composition in the can. In 1971 CAMDEN released I'm Not The Marrying Kind on the LP C'mon Everybody.

 

What A Wonderful Life

Elvis performs the brisk pop song with a lot of verve. The composers are called Sid Wayne and Jerry Livingston, and the King needed seven takes for this title as well. What A Wonderful Life was first available in LP format in 1971 on the album I Got Lucky.

 

Conclusion & evaluation

The fan receives the two movie compilations combined in an original packaging.

As far as known, the image rights to the cover are owned by BMG - Bertelsmann Music Group.