How is whiskey married

Not worried about whiskey collection / accumulation in the event of divorce?

  • The AG Munich lto.de/recht/nachrichten/n/ag-…sansbedarf-von-sammlungen/ has decided on a wine collection in the event of a divorce:

    A supply of wine is not a marital household item if it does not serve the common lifestyle, but is pursued by a spouse as a hobby. In the event of a separation, the other spouse is then not entitled to a division of the wines. This emerges from a decision of the AG Munich published on Monday.

    and further

    The wine did not serve the common lifestyle, but rather - similar to a stamp collection - is a hobby of the husband. The woman has no right to the surrender of half of the wine collection (judgment of 03.12.10, Az. 566 F 881/08).

    This decision should be transferable to a spouse's supply of whiskey.
  • ..good to know!

    It will only be difficult in those cases where both partners indicate wine or whiskey as a hobby ...

    only helps
  • It should be relevant here from whose account the collection was purchased. If it was a shared account, it sure looks worse than a personal account.

    I recommend a written agreement while the house blessing is still hanging, whether married or not. And yes, I know what I'm talking about!

    Best regards,
    pikesandmalts
  • G. Heuer wrote:

    If you have not made a corresponding property law regulation beforehand, then only one thing helps: Before the application of the divorce application threatens to be served, decapsulate the bottles and.


    That's too late! Before the separation has to be regulated or drunk. Of course, it is also possible to regulate later, but pigs are more likely to fly.

    Best regards,
    pikesandmalts
  • I asked very carefully, who is the lawyer here, or who repeats any things here that he has already heard somewhere?

    I am neither divorced nor do I intend to get a divorce, but I understand the sentence exactly as it stands:

    "A supply of wine is not a marital household item if it does not serve the common lifestyle, but is pursued by a spouse as a hobby."

    It is quite normal for a marriage to have different hobbies. Woman goes to wellness 4 times a month, he buys pulls or stamps. And that was treated the same way in this case and not included in the separation of property, wasn't it ?!

    I ask a lawyer to clarify this, the thread opener should start with that
  • A clear case: the man is allowed to keep the wine as such, but the woman may be entitled to compensation for the gain. This is what it says in the press release from the Bavarian judiciary:

    "Any compensation for an increase in value gained in the marriage is to be created via the property law (e.g. via the compensation for gains)."
    Candy is dandy
    but liquor is quicker.

    (Ogden Nash)
  • all right, that makes sense!
    Thanks for the clarification

    So forbid woman wellness and prefer to invest the money in a sauna and massage chair, which she can then take with her and serves as a balance to the bottles